Visit our new website: worldnews.easybranches.com

Step Aboard the Moa Poop Time Machine

  • Wed, 14 Feb 2018 03:13
Coprolites, or fossilized dung, double as ecological time capsules, preserving an incredible collection of information about past ecosystems. In Middle Earth (a.k.a. New Zealand) researchers from the University of Adelaide’s Australian Centre for DNA (ACAD) and Landcare Research NZ reconstructed a pre-civilization community using a bird dung time machine. Dung samples were amassed from numerous sites across the continent. The donors: four species of ratite birds including the extinct gian All DiscoverMagazine.com content

Tags


Related Stories

These Nearly Impossible Geography Questions Can Only Be Answered by Grade-Schoolers
  • Sun, 20 May 2018 15:20

Watch National Geographic staff answer questions from the National Geographic Bee, then test your own knowledge. National Geographic News

Instagram CEO confirms upcoming “time spent” Usage Insights
  • Sun, 20 May 2018 14:43

Instagram is jumping into the time well spent movement, following the unveiling of Google’s new time management controls last week. Code buried...

Giraffes surprise biologists yet again
  • Sun, 20 May 2018 13:16

New research has highlighted how little we know about giraffe behavior and ecology. All Top News -- ScienceDaily

Are we eating at the wrong time for our body clocks?
  • Sun, 20 May 2018 12:29

Is when we eat clashing with our circadian rhythms and could changing our mealtime habits boost our health? BBC News - Health

Mosquito Bites Leave A Lasting Impression On Our Immune System
  • Sun, 20 May 2018 11:24

Mosquito bites are like a gross form of French kissing — the insects swap your blood with their saliva, and leave a trail of salivary secretions be...

What I Learned Studying Real Vampires
  • Sun, 20 May 2018 09:22

[Editor's note: One of the most popular articles on our site is a piece by Georgia Institute of Technology researcher John Edgar Browning about his w...

Would Your Cat Choose You Over Its Food?
  • Sun, 20 May 2018 07:27

The stereotype of cats as aloof and indifferent is among many feline myths. National Geographic News

Matabele ants: Travelling faster with detours
  • Sun, 20 May 2018 05:15

Ants do not always take the shortest route when they are in a hurry. Their navigational system occasionally makes them take detours to speed up their ...

Meet the Scientist in Michael Curry's Royal Wedding Sermon
  • Sun, 20 May 2018 03:21

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin studied evolution, viewed consciousness as a mystic force, and waxed poetic on the "energies of love." National Geographic...

Meet the Volcanologist Running for Congress
  • Sun, 20 May 2018 01:14

It is always exciting (to me) when a scientist runs for public office -- and doubly so if that person is a geologist. There have been a few geologists...

Nations Step Up to Protect Pangolins in The Face of Strong Demand in China And Vietnam
  • Sun, 20 May 2018 01:10

It may come as a surprise to many to discover that a lowly anteater tops the list of the world’s most trafficked endangered mammals. The pangolin, a...

Pacific isle nations call out North Korea for first time, demanding concrete denuclearization steps
  • Sat, 19 May 2018 22:37

The two-day summit in Fukushima Prefecture wraps up with a joint declaration of the leaders' commitment to pressure tactics and a call for concrete ac...


News Categories